Re: Irish undotted i

From: Michael Everson (everson@evertype.com)
Date: Fri Mar 19 2004 - 14:21:42 EST

  • Next message: Marion Gunn: "Re: Irish dotless I"

    At 12:49 -0600 2004-03-19, Unspecified wrote:

    >In Irish writing that uses the dot-convention,
    >the dot represents lenition. Vowel phonemes are
    >not liable to lenition, so it doesn't make any
    >sense to have a dotted i, any more than a dotted
    >a, e, o, or u.

    When you write Irish in an orthography where you
    put a dot on a consonant to show lenition, in the
    coded text there are two characters: the
    consonant, and COMBINING DOT ABOVE.

    When you write Irish in an orthography where you
    put an accent on a vowel to show length, in the
    coded text there are two characters: the vowel,
    and COMBINING ACUTE.

    The dot on the "i" in Roman fonts is NEVER, EVER,
    represented by Turkish with COMBINING DOT ABOVE.

    The acute acent on the "" in Roman or Gaelic
    fonts is NEVER, EVER, represented by Turkish
    with COMBINING ACUTE.

    -- 
    Michael Everson * * Everson Typography *  * http://www.evertype.com
    


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