Re: Fixed Width Spaces (was: Printing and Displaying DependentVowels)

From: Antoine Leca (Antoine10646@leca-marti.org)
Date: Wed Mar 31 2004 - 06:36:29 EST

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    On Tuesday, March 30, 2004 11:42 PM, Ernest Cline va escriure:

    > The main usage is with compound words such as "ice cream" or
    > "Louis XIV" or commercial phrases such as "Camry SE" where for
    > esthetic reasons an author would prefer that the space not expand
    > upon justification,

    Well, as one that takes the pain to enter ALT+0160 here and there
    (particularly around and in French), I should say that I certainly would
    like the space between Louis and XIV, or between Camry and SE to stay of
    fixed width; on the other hand, I would expect the one between ice and cream
    to expand according to the rythm of the paragraph, in order to not break the
    reading. Like in

    Mum, I want an ice cream

    against

    Mum, I want an ice cream

    > I am not aware of any style guides that offer either
    > normative or informative guidance for either choice.

    The French guides of styles (after all, we can use Unicode to write French
    as well as English, can't we?) generally say that NBSP should not be
    expanded on justification. I do not know right now (I miss access to
    definitive references) if this is general to all non-breaking spaces,
    including those that do have fixed-width per se, or if it specifically
    applies to U+00A0. It should be outlined that non-breaking spaces occur
    rather frequently in French (around several punctuation characters), and
    because many word processors are not rich enough to encode it as it should
    (i.e., as ZWNBSP+THSP+ZWNBSP, \uFEFF\u2009\uFEFF), well they encode it as
    U+00A0 :-(.

    > NBSP ZWNJ breaks, but should it justify?
                ^^^^^^
    This is an error, isn't it?

    Antoine



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