Re: Tamil sha (U+0BB6) - deprecate it?

From: N. Ganesan (naa.ganesan@gmail.com)
Date: Mon Jun 27 2005 - 06:58:03 CDT

  • Next message: Patrick Andries: "Re: Tamil sha (U+0BB6) - deprecate it?"

    Curtis Clark (jcclark-lists@earthlink.net) wrote:

    On 2005-06-26 15:08, Richard Wordingham wrote:
    >> Actually, Unicode has added such a character,
    >> (U+014B), to the *script* used by the French
    >>*language*. I don't know how often it appears in
    >>French, but I have seen it in the spelling of
    >>Bangladesh on a map apparently in English,
    >> and it occasionally turns up in Indian names
    >> and terms written in English.

    >Another that came to mind is (thorn), "imposed"
    >upon the Latin script from Runic, a separate
    >alphabet, so that the Saxons could strengthen
    >their hegemony by writing the sounds of their
    >unmelodious language, sounds unneeded by French, >Spanish, or the
    original Latin. We thought we
    >had fought back their attack by omitting it from ASCII, >forcing them
    to use the t-h digraph (and ambiguously,
    >aha!, for it also is used for ), but our sweet victory
    >was overturned by the foul potentates of Unicode
    >and their Icelandic henchmen who forced, literally,
    >a thorn into our side.

    Closer to the home of Tamils, there are examples
    of Unicode characters not used by the majority at all.
    Take Devanagari script:
    http://www.unicode.org/charts/PDF/U0900.pdf
    U+090E, U+0912, U+0929, U+0931, U+0934, etc.,
    etc., Devanagari even has a new sign called Nukta
    to add new letters! So, to restrict Tamil *script* from
    not having minority letters will be suicidal.

    In Tamil code chart of Unicode, there is a wrong
    annotation about anuswaram & needs to be out.
    A sort of "m" and vocalic r (a sort of "ru") is
    used in transliterating Sanskrit, Kannada, Malayalam, etc.,
    into Tamil script. (BTW, the majority Tamil Grantha
    script (which has to get its own code page for Sanskrit
    books) letters of anusvara & vocalic r are little
    different, not "m" & "ru").

    N. Ganesan

    PS:
    Since Arabic is a widely used script in the Islamic
    world, there must be some encoded characters
    not used by majority or in particular region(s) & so on.
    (BTW, Tamil language was written in Arabic script,
    there were books printed in Arabi Tamil. I bet if we
    research enough, to represent Tamil-specific characters,
    some new characters were perhaps used).



    This archive was generated by hypermail 2.1.5 : Mon Jun 27 2005 - 06:59:40 CDT